Nebraska Medicine study suggests COVID-19 patients likely contaminate their surroundings

jhon pablo

A study released Sunday by Nebraska Medicine/UNMC suggests people with COVID-19 can produce widespread contamination of their environment. The study, based on samples taken from the rooms of COVID-19 patients, does not prove the virus spreads in airborne fashion, according to Nebraska Medicine researchers. The report noted that COVID-19 found […]

A study released Sunday by Nebraska Medicine/UNMC suggests people with COVID-19 can produce widespread contamination of their environment. The study, based on samples taken from the rooms of COVID-19 patients, does not prove the virus spreads in airborne fashion, according to Nebraska Medicine researchers. The report noted that COVID-19 found in air samples provided only limited evidence that there is the potential for airborne transmission.But the research found high levels of the virus on commonly-used surfaces and in the air of rooms of COVID-19 patients. In a news release, Nebraska Medicine also reported evidence in COVID-19 in air samplers outside of rooms where COVID-19 patients were treated.The study also suggests COVID-19 patients with even mild symptoms may be spread the virus and contaminate surfaces through coughing. “Our findings show how important it is for health care workers providing direct care to these patients to take enhanced transmission precautions,” said John Lowe, PhD, vice chancellor for Inter-professional Health Security Training and Education. The Nebraska Medicine/UNMC study examined eleven isolation rooms where 13 people with COVID-19 infections were treated. Commonly-used items including toilet facilities and air samples had evidence of the virus.Researchers say the study provides evidence that the disease might spread by both direct contact, as well as indirect contact, such as touching a contaminated object, or contracting the virus through airborne transmission.UNMC experts say the study indicates health care workers need to take extreme precautions to avoid the virus.”It’s why we have maintained COVID patients in rooms equipped with negative air flow and will continue to make efforts to do so – even with an increase in the number of patients.,” said Dr. James Lawler, UNMC Global Center for Health Security. In the news release, Nebraska Medicine/UNMC also advised the study stresses the importance of cleaning and disinfecting surfaces.

A study released Sunday by Nebraska Medicine/UNMC suggests people with COVID-19 can produce widespread contamination of their environment.

The study, based on samples taken from the rooms of COVID-19 patients, does not prove the virus spreads in airborne fashion, according to Nebraska Medicine researchers.

The report noted that COVID-19 found in air samples provided only limited evidence that there is the potential for airborne transmission.

But the research found high levels of the virus on commonly-used surfaces and in the air of rooms of COVID-19 patients. In a news release, Nebraska Medicine also reported evidence in COVID-19 in air samplers outside of rooms where COVID-19 patients were treated.

The study also suggests COVID-19 patients with even mild symptoms may be spread the virus and contaminate surfaces through coughing.

“Our findings show how important it is for health care workers providing direct care to these patients to take enhanced transmission precautions,” said John Lowe, PhD, vice chancellor for Inter-professional Health Security Training and Education.

The Nebraska Medicine/UNMC study examined eleven isolation rooms where 13 people with COVID-19 infections were treated. Commonly-used items including toilet facilities and air samples had evidence of the virus.

Researchers say the study provides evidence that the disease might spread by both direct contact, as well as indirect contact, such as touching a contaminated object, or contracting the virus through airborne transmission.

UNMC experts say the study indicates health care workers need to take extreme precautions to avoid the virus.

“It’s why we have maintained COVID patients in rooms equipped with negative air flow and will continue to make efforts to do so – even with an increase in the number of patients.,” said Dr. James Lawler, UNMC Global Center for Health Security.

In the news release, Nebraska Medicine/UNMC also advised the study stresses the importance of cleaning and disinfecting surfaces.

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