diet – Wiktionary

diet – Wiktionary

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English diet, dyet, diete, from Old French diete, from Medieval Latin dieta (regimen, regulation; assembly), from Latin diaeta, from Ancient Greek δίαιτα (díaita).

Noun[edit]

diet (plural diets)

  1. The food and beverage a person or animal consumes.
    The diet of the Giant Panda consists mainly of bamboo.
    • 2013, Martin D Buckland, ‎Lynda Hall, ‎Alan Mowlem, A Guide to Laboratory Animal Technology, page 56:
      It is common policy to order no more diet than will be used within one month.
  2. (countable) A controlled regimen of food and drink, as to gain or lose weight or otherwise influence health.
  3. (by extension) Any habitual intake or consumption.
    He’s been reading a steady diet of nonfiction for the last several years.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

diet (not comparable)

  1. (of a food or beverage) Containing less fat, salt, sugar, or calories than normal, or claimed to have such.
    diet soda
    • 1982, Consumer Guide, Dieter’s Complete Guide to Calories, Carbohydrates, Sodiums, Fats & Cholesterol, page 18:

      Many grocery chains offer premium-priced lean or diet hamburger; but the fat content is usually at least 10 percent, sometimes 15 percent or more.

    • 1998, Andy Sae, Chemical Magic from the Grocery Store:
      The difference in weight (mass) of the regular and the diet drink of the same brand roughly equals to the amount of sugar in the regular drink.
    • 2010, Lonely Planet Peru →ISBN, page 347:
      Diet Light (Pizarro 724; snacks S2-7; 9:30am-10pm)
      This perennially busy place serves not-very-diet, but yummy nonetheless, ice cream (S2 to S5) and whopping servings of mixed fruit (S3) – with ice cream.
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:diet.
  2. (informal, figuratively) Having certain traits subtracted.
    Synonym: lite

    You folks reduce it to the bible only as being authoritative, impoverishing the faith. “Christianity Lite”, diet Christianity for those who can’t handle the Whole Meal.

Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English dieten, dyeten, diȝeten, from Old French dïeter and Medieval Latin diētāre.

Verb[edit]

diet (third-person singular simple present diets, present participle dieting, simple past and past participle dieted)

  1. (transitive) To regulate the food of (someone); to put on a diet.
    • they will diet themselves, feed and live alone.
    • (Can we date this quote by Edmund Spenser and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      She diets him with fasting every day.
  2. (intransitive) To modify one’s food and beverage intake so as to decrease or increase body weight or influence health.
    I’ve been dieting for six months, and have lost some weight.
  3. (obsolete) To eat; to take one’s meals.
    • (Can we date this quote by Francis Bacon and provide title, author’s full name, and other details?)
      Let him [] diet in such places, where there is good company of the nation, where he travelleth.
  4. (obsolete, transitive) To cause to take food; to feed.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English diet, dyet, from Old French diete, from Medieval Latin diēta, diaeta (a public assembly; set day of trial; a day’s journey), from Latin diēs (day).

Noun[edit]

diet (plural diets)

  1. (usually capitalized as a proper noun) A council or assembly of leaders; a formal deliberative assembly.
    They were given representation of some important diet committees.
  2. (Scotland, law) The proceedings under a criminal libel.
  3. (Scotland) A clerical or ecclesiastical function in Scotland.
    a diet of worship

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Etymology[edit]

Revival by Flemish nationalists of Middle Dutch diet (people, folk), from Proto-Germanic *þeudō, from Proto-Indo-European *tewtéh₂. Compare Diets (Dutch, German).

Noun[edit]

diet n (uncountable)

  1. (Belgium) The Flemish people

Latvian[edit]

Verb[edit]

diet ?? missing information., 1st conj., pres. deju, dej, dej, past deju

  1. to dance (archaic)

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Contraction[edit]

diet

  1. Contraction of die dat.
  2. Contraction of die het.

Middle Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Medieval Latin diēta (daily allowance, regulation, daily order), from Ancient Greek δίαιτα (díaita).

Noun[edit]

diet f

  1. diet, régime; dieting

Mutation[edit]

Middle Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
diet diet
pronounced with /ð(ʲ)-/
ndiet
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]


Northern Sami[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Samic *tietë.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈtie̯h(t)/

Determiner[edit]

diet

  1. that (near the listener)

Inflection[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[1], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

diet

  1. simple past and past participle of die

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English diet.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

diet (plural diet, comparable)

  1. (of food or beverage) diet (containing lower-than-normal amounts of calories)

Related terms[edit]

See also[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

diet c

  1. a diet

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Etymology[edit]

From Chinese (MC tʰet̚). Doublet of lek and lik.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

diet (old orthography diet)

  1. iron (metal).

Source Article